patient care

Advance Care Planning

Conversations about end of life can be very uncomfortable; you may feel awkward bringing up the topic with loved ones and your doctor. Nevertheless, it is vitally important that you make your wishes known through advance directives.

Advance directives cover a variety of documents including Living Wills, Healthcare Powers of Attorney and Do Not Resuscitate orders.

The most important step, however, is having conversations with loved ones so they understand your wishes and will honor them if you are unable to speak for yourself!

Depending on your age, general health, family situation, goals and values, your wishes regarding various types of medical treatment – or the use of life-sustaining measures – can vary dramatically at each stage of your life.

It is important that you:

  • Make your wishes known in the event you cannot express them
  • Assure your family understands your choices – before a crisis occurs
  • Provide documentation that supports and explains your wishes to your doctor and loved ones

Each of these steps will empower your family to make treatment decisions that respect your feelings and values. Equally important, they will not be burdened by having to make those decisions, without your input, in a crisis situation.

Prevent confusion and undo stress – and assure your care is what YOU want it to be – by making sure your family has up-to-date information about your end-of-life wishes.

As founding members of the Advance Care Planning Coalition of Greater Toledo, we can offer assistance in understanding or completing advance directives. If you would like to download the necessary forms to complete on your own, contact Leading Age Ohio.

Experiencing...

     

Is It Time?

Suggested Reading

My Mother, Your Mother: Embracing "Slow Medicine," the Compassionate Approach to Caring for Your Aging Loved

By Dennis McCullough

Handbook for Mortals: Guidance for People Facing Serious Illnesses

By Joanne Lynn, M.D. and Joan Harrold, M.D.

The Orphaned Adult: Confronting the Death of a Parent

By Marc Angel

View More Suggestions

"I would like to thank everyone who was a part of my mom's care. She was at home and had hospice care. I know that I wouldn't have been able to keep my mom with me if it wasn't for hospice. Mom lived with me for 20 years with early onset Alzheimer's. And when the end of life part came she was in house and she had such caring nurses, aides and doctor. Our care made the end of her life very peaceful and that meant so much to our family."